Maximize Your Golf Performance

July 7, 2014 1:15p | CORE PT & MC | by CORE Movement Specialists 


After a long winter, it’s time to grab your clubs and hit the course.  Golfers start the season with renewed enthusiasm; however over the next few months may become dissatisfied about their performance or plagued by recurring injuries.  Many spend the off season on gym based training, completion of traditional golf programs, video analysis, lessons with your pro and/or purchasing new equipment.  Despite these efforts, why do appreciable changes in your game elude you?   It’s simple, you are moving wrong. 

Your performance potential is only as good as your movement control and efficiency.  In golf, timing and consistency are crucial for optimal performance.  Traditional length and strength programs can only get you so far.  Technique based training also encounters barriers of 1) sport specific muscle memory and 2) movement faults.  Your body may lack the necessary movement assets to implement a desired technique.  So, let’s investigate how movement faults can impact the accuracy and efficiency of your golf game.  

Movement faults encompass anything that forces you to deviate from an ideal path of movement or compensate.  This includes tissue restrictions you must work around, muscle inefficiencies that require you to switch to a less desirable muscle or “back-up strategy”, poor recruitment timing and inefficient braking mechanisms.  Yikes, what does all of that mean?  Basically, there are numerous strategies your brain can employ to swing the club; however not all strategies are desirable for efficient and effective ball strike whether teeing off or on the putting green.  Anytime your brain encounters a limitation due to tissue restriction or muscle inefficiency it will choose the next best pattern available to complete the task; however, that “back-up strategy” sacrifices the ideal path of movement, changes recruitment timing and dramatically affects the accuracy of your game while also putting you at risk for injuries.  If you want to get the most out of all of your golf game you need to fix your movement first.  

Effective movement training requires thorough screening to identify the site, direction and threshold of your movement faults; specific muscle training for your impairments and the desired physiological change; and integration of your new assets into sport.  Not all golf programs or trainers are created equal.  Programs lacking detailed assessment and training specificity will not fix how you move; rather they mask or reinforce your limitations.  Chose a skilled movement specialist to devise a program to resolve your movement faults and ensure you have the movement assets necessary to excel on and off the course.  Don’t let movement faults you may not even know you have limit your potential.   The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.  Do something different.  Change your game.